pq\Result: Overview

An synchronous pq\Connection::exec*() call, or calls to pq\Connection::getResult() after using asynchronous queries returns an instance of pq\Result on success. See Query execution, optionally with types and Prepared Statements for details about how to execute queries.

Fetch types:

pq\Result supports the follwing fetch types:

The fetch type is inherited from pq\Connection::$defaultFetchType can be set through the public property named pq\Result::$fetchType, to be used when no fetch type is specified in the call to a fetch method.

Number of rows:

The number of rows can be obtained from the public readonly property pq\Result::$numRows, or passing the result instance, which implements the Countable interface, to the count() function.

Number of columns:

The number of columns each row has, can be obtained from the public readonly property pq\Result::$numCols.

Fetching everything as an array of rows:

pq\Result::fetchAll() fetches the complete result set as an array of arrays or objects, depending on the default fetch type, as explained above, or the fetch type passed as first argument to the method.

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT id, name, email FROM accounts WHERE email LIKE '_@%'");

    foreach ($result->fetchAll(pq\Result::FETCH_OBJECT) as $row)  {
        echo "ID:   {$row->id}\n";
        echo "Name: {$row->name}\n";
        echo "Mail: {$row->email}\n\n";
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

pq\Result implements the virtual Traversable interface, so the above task can also be accomplished by this code:

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;
    $connection->defaultFetchType = pq\Result::FETCH_OBJECT;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT id, name, email FROM accounts WHERE email LIKE '_@%'");

    foreach ($result as $row)  {
        echo "ID:   {$row->id}\n";
        echo "Name: {$row->name}\n";
        echo "Mail: {$row->email}\n\n";
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

Iteratively fetching row by row:

pq\Result::fetchRow() will return FALSE when the end of the result set has been reached.

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT id, name, email FROM accounts WHERE email LIKE '_@%'");

    while (list($id, $name, $email) = $result->fetchRow())  {
        echo "ID:   {$id}\n";
        echo "Name: {$name}\n";
        echo "Mail: {$email}\n\n";
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

As with most fetch*() methods, the fetch type can be passed as argument here, too.

Fetching a single column by row:

Because a column value can be NULL or FALSE, pq\Result::fetchCol() stores the value into the first argument passed by reference. The demanded column index/name can be passed as second argument, where column indices start with 0, which is also the default.

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT email FROM accounts WHERE email LIKE '_@%'");

    while ($result->fetchCol($email))  {
        echo "Mail: {$email}\n";
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

When the end of the result set has been reached, pq\Result::fetchCol() will return FALSE.

NOTE: pq\Result::fetchCol() does not accept a fetch type argument.

Fetching bound variables:

It is possible to bind variables to result columns by reference by calling pq\Result::bind() for each demanded column and then retreive the results by calling pq\Result::fetchBound() iteratively.

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT id, name, email FROM accounts WHERE email LIKE '_@%'");

    $result->bind("id", $id);
    $result->bind("name", $name);
    $result->bind("email", $email);

    while ($result->fetchBound()) {
        echo "ID:   {$id}\n";
        echo "Name: {$name}\n";
        echo "Mail: {$email}\n\n";
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

pq\Result::bind() expects the column index/name as first argument and the variable to bind by reference to this result column as second argument.

NOTE: pq\Result::fetchBound() does not accept a fetch type argument.

Fetching simple maps:

pq\Result::map() fetches the complete result set as a simple map, a multi dimensional array, each dimension indexed by a column.

Consider the following example:

<?php

try {
    $connection = new pq\Connection;

    $result = $connection->exec("SELECT a,b,c from generate_series(1,3) a, 
                                                   generate_series(4,6) b, 
                                                   generate_series(7,9) c");

    foreach($result->map(array(0,1,2)) as $a => $aa) {
        foreach ($aa as $b => $bb) {
            foreach ($bb as $c => $res) {
                printf("%s,%s,%s = %s   ", $a, $b, $c, implode(",", $res));
            }
            printf("\n");
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
} catch (\pq\Exception $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

?>

It should produce:

1,4,7 = 1,4,7   1,4,8 = 1,4,8   1,4,9 = 1,4,9   
1,5,7 = 1,5,7   1,5,8 = 1,5,8   1,5,9 = 1,5,9   
1,6,7 = 1,6,7   1,6,8 = 1,6,8   1,6,9 = 1,6,9   

2,4,7 = 2,4,7   2,4,8 = 2,4,8   2,4,9 = 2,4,9  // This should help generate maps 
2,5,7 = 2,5,7   2,5,8 = 2,5,8   2,5,9 = 2,5,9  // of f.e. statistical data with   
2,6,7 = 2,6,7   2,6,8 = 2,6,8   2,6,9 = 2,6,9  // some GROUP BYs etc.           

3,4,7 = 3,4,7   3,4,8 = 3,4,8   3,4,9 = 3,4,9   
3,5,7 = 3,5,7   3,5,8 = 3,5,8   3,5,9 = 3,5,9   
3,6,7 = 3,6,7   3,6,8 = 3,6,8   3,6,9 = 3,6,9   

pq\Result::map() optionally expects an array containing the column indices/names used to index the map as first argument, and uses the first column (at index 0) by default. The second argument can optionally be an array of column indices/names which should build up the leaf entry of the map. A fetch type can also be specified as optional third argument.